The very quotable Spanish cellist Pablo Casals had a way of conveying emotion not only through music but also through words. “Music will save the world,” he once said, and “Music is the divine way to tell beautiful, poetic things to the heart.” With an emotional connection to their tools, musicians are able to describe their art and their instruments in ways that evoke true joy. Of his own instrument, Casals—who also played piano and violin—said: “The cello is like a beautiful woman who has not grown older but younger with time, more slender, more supple, more graceful.”

Here, six students at Lynn University’s Conservatory of Music describe their instruments of love and the beauty that lies within.

 


Yana Lyashko art&culture magazine spring 2018 sweet music

 

“Made from the wood of trees, the harp comes from nature, and it has a soul. I love its patterns and composition, both in sound and in form. It is truly an instrument from the heavens. If I had to describe it in one word? Tender.” 

Yana Lyashko, 26, harp, Uzbekistan

 


 

 

When I look at my instrument, it is of an old tree. I feel at peace among the fluidity of the curves and the sharp corners coming together to make something so balanced. It has become an extension of me, and to me it is home.”

– Evan Musgrave, 22, double bass, Ormond Beach, Florida

 

Sweet Music art&culture magazine spring 2018 double bass

 

Sweet Music art&culture spring 2018 clarinet

 

“The clarinet has taught me responsibility, friendship, and partnership. The greatest moments of my life, moments in which I have felt the most joy and the most sadness, have always been with my instrument. So for me, the clarinet is nostalgia.” 

Dunia Andreu Benitez, 24, clarinet, Havana, Cuba

 


 

I could not describe the beauty of the trombone any better than French composer Hector Berlioz does in this quote: ‘In my opinion, the trombone is the true head of the family of wind instruments, which I have named “the epic one.” It possesses nobility and grandeur to the highest degree; it has all the serious and powerful tones of sublime musical poetry, from religious, calm, and imposing accents to savage, orgiastic outburst. Directed by the will of the master, the trombones can chant like a choir of priests, threaten, utter gloomy sighs, a mournful lament, or a bright hymn of glory; they can break forth into awe-inspiring cries and awaken the dead or doom the living with their fearful voices.’ My instrument is a beast—in a good way.”

– Tamas Markovics, trombone, Budapest, Hungary

 

Sweet Music art&culture magazine spring 2018 trombone

 

Sweet Music art&culture spring 2018 clarinet

 

“The most beautiful thing about my instrument, I believe, are its seams and joints. I love seeing exactly how it is put together, everything fitting perfectly like a puzzle. When I look at my violin, I think about how powerful it is—every time I see it, I am reminded of so many years of experiences and enjoyment.”

Virginia Mangum, 20, violin, Nashville, Tennessee

 


 

 

“The French horn is majestic. The most beautiful part of its design is the way it is wrapped…. It has a unique, circular shape with a wide, flared, elegant bell. But the really fascinating part is its uncoiled horn—it’s nearly 18 feet long! The length allows it to produce overtones and a diverse range of colors and emotions. I think the science behind my emotional vehicle is astounding, and the idea that the power to move, excite, and heal audiences lies at my fingertips is just magical.”

– Christala Rotolo, 18, French horn, Pembroke Pines, Florida

 

Sweet Music art&culture magazine spring 2018 trombone

 

Music Appreciation

Don’t miss these upcoming performances at the Lynn University Conservatory of Music.

April 15
Lynn Bassoon Studio Recital
An afternoon of bassoon chamber music, with works by Mozart, Vivaldi, and Ozzy Osbourne.
4 p.m., free, Count and Countess de Hoernle International Center/Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall

April 16
Pianist and Singer Nancy Elton
Based in Atlanta, Elton has served on the faculties of the University of Georgia and Georgia State University. The program will be a mini-recital followed by a master class. 2 p.m., free, Count and Countess de Hoernle International Center/Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall

April 16
Flute Master Class with Néstor Torres
With his rhythmic and mellifluous jazz flute sound, Torres has released 14 solo recordings, earning four Latin Grammy nominations and one Latin Grammy Award. He has collaborated with artists including Gloria Estefan, Kenny Loggins, Dave Matthews, Herbie Hancock, and Tito Puente. 7 p.m., free, Count and Countess de Hoernle International Center/Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall

April 19
An Evening of Chamber Music and Poems
7:30 p.m., $10, Snyder Sanctuary

April 21-22
Lynn Philharmonia No. 6
Conductor Guillermo Figueroa; featuring Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 in F Major, Mariano Morales’s Flute Concerto (Néstor Torres on flute), and Marquez’s Danzón No. 2.
Saturday, 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, 4 p.m., $35-$50, Keith C. and Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center

April 26
Dean’s Showcase No. 4
7:30 p.m., $10, Count and Countess de Hoernle International Center/Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall

April 28
Class of 2018 Concert
7:30 p.m., $10, Count and Countess de Hoernle International Center/Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall

April 29
John Oliveira String Competition Winner Recital
4 p.m., free, Count and Countess de Hoernle International Center/Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall

May 5
Preparatory School of Music Spring Recital
11 a.m., free, Count and Countess de Hoernle International Center/Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall

For tickets, visit the Lynn University box office located in the Wold at 3601 N. Military Trail, or purchase online at events.lynn.edu or by phone at 561.237.9000.